Morongo Tribe Owned Casino Stops Gaming Campaign for More Slot Machines

On May 12, 2007, the Morongo Band Tribe suddenly stopped their $2 million worth of advertisements seeking public approval in accordance with their new agreement with the state.

The new agreement of the Morongo Band Tribe with the state says that in return for the pullout of the advertisement, the state will allow the tribe to add more slot machines to their offerings at their casino facility in Palm Springs.

A rival tribe commented that the advertisements, which implore the public to ask their legislators to support the new Indian gaming compacts, unfairly speaks on behalf of all the Indian Tribes in Southern California.

Robert Martin, the Chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indian Tribe, said that if one tribe speaks on behalf of all tribes by using a massive advertisement campaign, it could confuse the public.

The Morongo Indian Tribe spent $2 million in order to convince the legislators and the public about the gaming compacts and the governor's permission for the compacts.

The gaming compacts are necessary for the expansion of the number of the slot machines that the tribe offers at their new casino facility on Interstate 10 near Cabazon.

The gaming compact campaign featured phone calls to voters in vital districts in California. Some of the members of the assembly said that type of campaign backfired, because some of the callers even told the assembly members to vote against the gaming compact.

One of the assembly members, Albert Torrico, a Democrat from Fremont, said that they will not be easily persuaded by the gaming campaign conducted by the Indian Tribes.